Library Mission Statement

Azusa City Library Mission Statement
The Mission Statement for the Azusa City Library was developed by staff and approved by the City Council.

The Vision
As a gateway to knowledge, the Library creates a more informed, literate and cultured community in a city that is a Gateway to the American Dream. Traditional library services blend with new technologies to provide accelerated access to cultural, educational and recreational resources for lifelong learning.

The Mission
The Azusa City Library’s mission is to provide its customers with resources for individuals to become successful and responsible citizens in today’s complex society. Library programs and specialized services support the pursuit of lifelong learning, academic success, and computer literacy. The library welcomes diversity with culturally appropriate services and a helpful, friendly, expert bilingual staff.
Carnegie Connection
One of the original Carnegie Libraries
The Azusa City Library dates back to August 27, 1887, when G.T. Brown and Fred Frye proposed the idea. In October of that year the Azusa Library Association was formed. On January 2, 1888 the 1st regular meeting was held in the office of Judge Shelton, and Philip Hart was chosen president of the Association, with John Wise. There were 65 members of the Azusa Library Association the 1st year, with $339.75 in subscriptions.

A black and white photograph of the Azusa Public Library
The Library Association was organized in November 1889, and books were moved to the millinery store of Mrs. E.P. Rice, the 1st Librarian. In 1896 the Library was moved to the corner room in the Brunjes Hotel. Money for the equipment and books for the new room was given by Mrs. L.S. MacNeil, who raised more than $700 through a benefit in Slauson Hall. Subscriptions of $24.75 a month were pledged by local citizens to maintain the institution

The Association became inactive in 1900 and the books were stored in the Pomotropic office until 1901, when the Azusa Woman's Club was organized. The Association was revived and Mrs. Clapp was appointed as the Librarian. In 1902 the Azusa Free Library was set up, and in 1904 it was moved to the old City Hall. In 1910, with a $ 10,000 grant from Andrew Carnegie, the Library was built in the place of the current City Hall. The City provided the site and $2,000 and the Woman's Club furnished the Juvenile Room. In 1959, the present Library building was built.

Additional Information

Find out more about Andrew Carnegie!